Xanax taper success stories (3+ heart-warming stories) 

By

Author bio

Page last updated: 23/09/2022

In this brief article, we are going to talk about successful Xanax taper stories. Xanax is a benzodiazepine which is one of the commonly prescribed anti-anxiety medications, but it is quite easy to be addicted to Xanax. 

This blog will cover some real experiences and we will learn what can make you Xanax withdrawal a bit easy. 

Is it difficult to taper off Xanax? 

Yes, it can become extremely difficult to taper off Xanax. It is one of the most common drugs which are misused worldwide. Xanax (Generic name: Alprazolam) is a benzodiazepine. It mimics the actions of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), which is an inhibitory neurotransmitter. 

This way xanax controls the excessive neuronal firing in your brain and helps relax your muscles. It generates a calming sensation, reduces your anxiety, and helps induce sleep. This is exactly why xanax can be used for the treatment of insomnia. 

However, this medicine can become one hell of an addiction, if not used properly. Xanax has a rapid onset of action and is sometimes called short acting benzodiazepines. It starts to work as soon as 30 minutes after taking the first ever dose. 

However, this effect does not last very long and starts to wear off in 8 to 10 hours, depending on the physiological conditions. This makes it a perfect drug for insomnia without having any residual effects during the daytime, but it can also open doors for addiction to come in. 

When the effects start to fade away, the anxiety and restlessness starts to creep in again. This makes people want to take more frequent doses of Xanax. 

When this becomes a habit, that’s when you know you’re starting to become an addict. This is exactly why it is strongly recommended to stick to your doctor’s prescribed dose and don’t take any more than that. 

What actual people have to say about successfully tapering off Xanax? 

Many people have revealed what they have gone through during Xanax withdrawal. Joseph, a 59 year old former Xanax user stated:

“Let’s just please normalise tapering off anti-anxiety meds. I had been using Xanax for more than 20 years and I did taper it off successfully. I am definitely not trying to tell you that my journey was easy. It was far from it.”

Joseph continued:

“When my doc started my taper schedule, I was pretty optimistic about it. I have always been the kind of person who loves to take care of himself and that’s what I always did. I had that kind of feeling that no matter what happens, proper care will help me recover. I was a little too optimistic here.”

Before continuing what Joseph said further, I would like to agree with the point he made that proper care can help us recover. Our basic health needs to be good in order to make sure that our body is strong enough to fight against the addiction or cravings. 

If we continue to eat good and healthy food, stay active, drink plenty of water, do meditation, and generally take care of ourselves, then we can achieve great things. 

It will not only help our physical health, but I’m sure it can do wonders for our mental health as well. Let’s go back to what Joseph was trying to tell us. He continued:

“I started taking a lower dose of Xanax and that’s when the actual nightmare kicked in. I suffered from rebound anxiety and insomnia. Let me tell you one thing: rebound anxiety is far more worse than your initial anxiety. At one point, it started ruining my personality, but I had other plans for myself. 

Joseph further stated:

“I started taking good care of myself. I started taking some natural herbs that helped calm down my nerves and made it easier for me to fall asleep. I made stretching a part of my routine before bedtime to help relax my muscles. A few lifestyle changes slowly made me feel better. Now I have no Xanax in my system and I’m more healthy than I have ever been my entire life.”

This is indeed an amazing review. I’m sure it can fill you up with hope if you’re thinking of Xanax withdrawal. He told us that it’s not a fairytale and we can’t expect it to be, but it’s not impossible. 

It’s not too bad to work a little harder on ourselves. We actually owe ourselves that. Another Xanax addiction survivor, Kathy, stated:

“Xanax had been my friend for so long when my doctor advised to taper it off. I suffered from anxiety and insomnia most of my life, but you can’t stay on meds. It took me a while to make up my mind to live without Xanax, but I eventually came along. My physician started to reduce the dose slowly so that my body won’t go all nuts and it worked well for me.”

Xanax taper success stories (3+ heart-warming stories) 

She continued:

“The first withdrawal symptom that I experienced was insomnia relapse. I would stay awake till 4am in the morning, staring at the ceiling, thinking why this is happening to me. Why do I have to quit Xanax? I had so many why’s. Yes, this was my rebound anxiety.”

Anxiety and insomnia are the most common things to happen to a person who is trying to taper off Xanax after using this med for quite a while. It is totally expected and there’s nothing to worry about. 

If your body can adjust to medication, what makes you think it can’t adapt to living without any meds? Meds are supposed to be our friend only when we need them. They should not be a normal part of your life unless absolutely necessary. Kathy further stated:

“Trust me when I tell you this, nothing is impossible. It might be a little hard, but when I finally went Xanax free, I could feel the happiness of having nothing to depend on. I felt like I was whole again and I was perfectly healthy. It was the best thing that had happened to me. Xanax helped me when I needed it the most in my life and it let me go when I was done.”

Doesn’t this make you happy when you read success stories like this one? How hard people try to get their health back in their own hands. It’s a blessing when you know you don’t have to rely on any medication to lead a normal life. Jessica, another Xanax survivor stated:

“My Xanax withdrawal story is a little different than usual stories and this is exactly why I had to share it so that you could know that there might be another good way of stopping Xanax. After realising that I’m too sensitive to successfully taper off Xanax, my doc put me on Valium.”

Jessica further stated:

“I’m not sure if you know what Valium is, but it is a brand name of Diazepam. It’s another benzodiazepine or you can say, it’s Xanax’s other sister. My doc said that it’s easier to taper off Valium as compared to Xanax. So I took Valium for a while and then I carefully tapered it off. It helped me a lot.”

She continued:

“I wanted to tell you this so you could know this is also an option if you’re too sensitive for Xanax withdrawal, like me. You can talk to your physician and it may work for you just as well as it did for me. Whoever’s trying to cut off Xanax, I’m sure you can do it. Don’t lose hope.”

I would like to sincerely thank Jessica for letting people know about her story and how she successfully tapered off Xanax. Martin, another former Xanax addict stated:

“I know it is difficult to taper off meds like Xanax, but it’s not impossible. I was like a Xanax junkie once and now as I’m writing this review, I’m completely Xanax free. Don’t ever think something is impossible for you. We actually become a reflection of what we think we are. Keep thinking good about yourself. Keep reminding yourself that you’re stronger than you know.”

I completely agree with Martin. We are what we think we are. If you continue to tell yourself that you can’t do something, I’m sure you won’t be able to. This is exactly why you should keep reminding yourself, as Martin said, that you’re stronger than you know. 

Tell yourself that you have immense strength and so many more versions of you that you haven’t unlocked yet. If you believe in yourself, you can conquer the entire world. How hard could Xanax withdrawal be then? Think about it. 

Conclusion 

In this blog post, we have discussed successful Xanax taper stories. Xanax is a benzodiazepine which is one of the commonly prescribed anti-anxiety medications, but it is quite easy to be addicted to Xanax.  as soon as 30 minutes after taking the first ever dose. 

However, this effect does not last very long and starts to wear off in 8 to 10 hours, depending on the physiological conditions. This makes people want to take more frequent doses of Xanax. 

When this becomes a habit, that’s when you know you’re starting to become an addict. This is exactly why it is strongly recommended to stick to your doctor’s prescribed dose and don’t take any more than that. 

FAQs: Xanax taper success stories  

How do I get myself off of Xanax?

The best way to get off Xanax is dose tapering. Xanax can become one hell of an addiction, if not used properly. Xanax has a rapid onset of action and is sometimes called short acting benzodiazepines. It starts to work as soon as 30 minutes after taking the first ever dose. This makes people want to take more frequent doses of Xanax. When this becomes a habit, that’s when you know you’re starting to become an addict.

Do Benzos need to be tapered?

Yes, Benzodiazepines do need to be tapered. These meds are capable of causing an addiction, some more severely than the others. This is exactly why it is strongly recommended to stick to your doctor’s prescribed dose and don’t take any more than that. If you wish to stop using it, consult your healthcare provider. Do not stop it abruptly. 

Can you safely take Xanax?

Yes, you can definitely take xanax safely. People get addicted because they overuse this medication. It is prescription medication and no doctor gives you a dose too high that affects your normal body functions. It’s the people who get carried away because of the stress free and sleep inducing nature of xanax. A doctor would never prescribe this medication for longer than your actual need.

Is xanax addictive? 

Addiction or physical and psychological dependence is one of the most common concerns associated with the excessive and prolonged use of xanax. These medicines can constantly make you crave more of them and that’s how you actually become addicted.

What medications are contraindicated with xanax?

  • Other anti-anxiety medications or sleeping pills. The concomitant use can dangerously increase the sedation and may cause confusion. 
  • Antipsychotic medications
  • Opioid drugs, including painkillers and anti-tussive (cough relieving) medications. The concomitant use can cause serious psychological side effects and respiratory depression. 
  • Alcohol

References