What is the best antidepressant to take with Seroquel? (3 options) 

As a BetterHelp affiliate, we may receive compensation from BetterHelp if you purchase products or services through the links provided

In this blog post, we are going to answer the question, “What is the best antidepressant to take with Seroquel?”. Seroquel is an atypical antipsychotic medication that can be used to treat a variety of mental health-related problems. 

It is even approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to be used as add-on therapy with antidepressants. This blog will cover what antidepressant works best with Seroquel and how to ensure the safe and effective use of these two meds together. 

What is the best antidepressant to take with Seroquel?

Counseling is Key to a Healthy Marr...
Counseling is Key to a Healthy Marriage

The best antidepressants to take with Seroquel include:

  • Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) 
  • Serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) 
  • Wellbutrin (Bupropion) 

Seroquel (Generic name: Quetiapine) is an atypical antipsychotic medication. It is primarily used for the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The drug can be used for other conditions as well, including autism, irritability and major depressive disorders. 

Its exact mechanism of action is still unknown. However, experts believe that the drug acts as an agonist of some of the dopamine receptors including D2 receptors and some of the serotonin receptors including 5HT1A receptors. 

The experts have also added that Seroquel can inhibit serotonin 5HT2A receptors actively. As Seroquel is an atypical antipsychotic, it is considered safer than typical antipsychotics which possess a higher risk of causing extrapyramidal side effects. 

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) 

SSRIs are one of the most effective antidepressants to be combined with Seroquel. Several studies have indicated that this combination can work wonders in some people and can actively manage conditions as severe as major depressive disorder (MDD). 

The combination is also tolerated well by people and it has a good safety profile. However, it still can cause some serious side effects in certain kinds of people and the doses at which you take can play an important role in preventing these harmful effects. Common SSRIs include:

  • Sertraline (Zoloft) 
  • Escitalopram (Lexapro) 
  • Citalopram (Celexa) 
  • Paroxetine (Paxil) 
  • Fluoxetine (Prozac) 

We all are aware of the fact that antidepressants, especially SSRIs, take some time to kick in. SSRIs usually take 4-6 weeks to start working, and in some cases, they could take as long as 8-12 weeks. When we combine SSRIs with Seroquel, your antidepressant kicks in faster. 

With Seroquel, you might begin to notice some changes in around 2 to 3 weeks. This indicates that Seroquel enhances the effects of SSRIs and it turns out to be in your best interest. 

Another beneficial effect of the combination of Seroquel and SSRIs is the fact that Seroquel balances the activating effects of antidepressants and it may save you from SSRI-induced insomnia and anxiety. 

In fact, the drug will help manage your insomnia and anxiety to some extent and will help calm you down. The combination has proven to be safe and effective in the management and treatment of the major depressive disorder (MDD). 

It also works in a safe and effective manner for the management and treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Common side effects associated with the use of SSRIs include

  • Nausea 
  • Vomiting 
  • Diarrhoea or Constipation 
  • Acid reflux or heartburn 
  • Abdominal pain 
  • Loss of appetite 
  • Weight gain or loss 
  • Excessive sweating or night sweating (nocturnal/night hyperhidrosis) 
  • Frequent urination 
  • Polydipsia or excessive thirst
  • Tremors 
  • Muscle twitching and pain
  • Drowsiness 
  • Dizziness 
  • Excessive tiredness or fatigue 
  • Insomnia or inability to fall asleep 
  • Xerostomia or dry mouth 
  • Dysmenorrhea or heavy periods
  • Flu-like symptoms including irritation in eyes and runny nose
  • Sexual side effects 

Serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) 

Seroquel can also be paired with serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors. However, this combination may not work well for everyone. This is because, unlike SSRIs, SNRIs work to inhibit the reuptake of serotonin as well as norepinephrine. 

The excess of another excitatory neurotransmitter may cause some additional side effects in some people. Some common SNRIs include:

  • Venlafaxine (Effexor) 
  • Duloxetine (Cymbalta) 
  • Desvenlafaxine (Pristiq) 
  • Milnacipran (Ixel) 
  • Levomilnacipran (Fetzima) 

Studies have revealed that Seroquel in combination with Venlafaxine can be great in the management and treatment of persistent types of depression that do not usually respond to normal antidepressant monotherapy. 

The combination can also help manage the severity of anxiety and restlessness in some people. However, studies have also revealed that the combination of Seroquel and Duloxetine may cause abnormal side effects like dizziness, confusion, forgetfulness, drowsiness, impaired thinking, etc. 

This indicates that although the combination of Seroquel and SNRIs can help manage your mental health condition, the side effects may become too difficult for some people. 

Studies also indicate the importance of dose adjustment in this case and reveal that lower doses of these two meds can achieve great therapeutic outcomes, whereas higher doses can cause great damage. 

This is why you should always stick to your doctor’s recommended dose and should never take any combination of meds without your doctor’s approval. Some side effects associated with the use of SNRIs include

  • Drowsiness
  • Fatigue
  • Sleepiness or hypersomnia
  • Decreased salivation leading to dry mouth 
  • Vertigo 
  • Loss of appetite 
  • Excessive sweating
  • Constipation or diarrhoea 
  • Weight gain or loss
  • Abdominal pain
  • Bloating 
  • Flatulence 
  • Headache 
  • Muscular pain 

Wellbutrin (Bupropion) 

Wellbutrin can also be paired with Seroquel. Wellbutrin is a dopamine and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor. It works by actively inhibiting the reuptake of these two excitatory neurotransmitters to counteract the symptoms associated with depression and other mental health related problems. 

It does not affect the levels of serotonin. However, Wellbutrin may not suit everyone. It is a known fact that medications don’t work on people in the exact same way. Some people are more sensitive to them, hence they feel a greater difference in their conditions.

However, the greater difference in their condition is not the only thing they experience. Such people tend to suffer from more side effects as compared to people who are not too sensitive to meds like antidepressants. 

Wellbutrin may make a good pair with Seroquel for the management of your mental health condition, especially major depressive disorder and anxiety, but they do possess some risks. 

Wellbutrin is well known for causing seizures and it is considered one of the major complications that could possibly arise from Wellbutrin use. Seroquel, on the other hand, can also cause this side effect. 

The combination therapy may increase the risk of seizures in normal and healthy individuals. This possible complication is the reason why the use of this combination is limited to people who do not have epilepsy.

People who already suffer from epileptic seizures cannot bear this combination, hence it is not a good choice of treatment for them. Make sure you talk to your healthcare provider and not make any such decision on your own. 

Some of the common side effects associated with the use of Wellbutrin include:

  • Anxiousness 
  • Unexplainable excitement and happiness 
  • Insomnia or inability to fall asleep 
  • Xerostomia or dry mouth 
  • Dizziness 
  • Drowsiness 
  • Nausea with or without vomiting 
  • Abdominal pain 
  • Headache 
  • Tremors 
  • Weight loss 
  • Loss of appetite 
  • Tinnitus or ringing in the ears 
  • Excessive sweating 
  • Altered sense of taste and smell
  • Constipation 
  • Throat infection 
  • Increased frequency of urination

There are a lot of other factors that can affect your medication intake. The presence of any underlying health condition can significantly affect your entire treatment plan for depression and not every medication can work well in your body. 

If you already suffer from a chronic disease like liver disease, kidney disease, heart disease, metabolic disease like diabetes, or some other chronic disease like asthma, the choices of antidepressants may be limited for you. 

This is because you already have other prescription drugs that your body does not allow you to stop. When these meds are paired with antidepressants, it may cause a number of complications for you. 

This is why you should always give out your medication history properly and should never hide anything from your healthcare provider. The kind of lifestyle you lead can also help you with your symptoms. 

Make sure you drink plenty of water, eat good food, take some time out for exercise, and have a positive and motivating mindset. 

Conclusion 

In this blog post, we have discussed the best antidepressant to take with Seroquel. Seroquel is an atypical antipsychotic medication that can be used to treat a variety of mental health conditions. 

It can be paired with a number of antidepressants for safe and effective treatment and management of major depressive disorder (MDD). We have learned that Seroquel can be paired with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, and Wellbutrin. 

It may also be combined with some antidepressants that are not mentioned here. However, you should always ask your healthcare provider and should never take any medication without your doctor’s approval. 

FAQs: best antidepressant to take with Seroquel

Can you take an SSRI with Seroquel?

Yes, you can take an SSRI with Seroquel, but only if your healthcare provider prescribes this combination. When we combine SSRIs with Seroquel, your antidepressant kicks in faster. With Seroquel, you might begin to notice some changes in around 2 to 3 weeks. This indicates that Seroquel enhances the effects of SSRIs and it turns out to be in your best interest. Seroquel also balances the activating effects of your antidepressant. 

Should Zoloft and Seroquel be taken together?

Yes, you can take Zoloft and Seroquel together, but only if your healthcare provider prescribes this combination. The concomitant use of Zoloft and Seroquel does hold some clinical importance, but it is also associated with some risks and common side effects that we will discuss shortly. 

The purpose of combining two meds together is to increase efficacy and decrease the risk of side effects by lowering the dose of each of the drugs. This is why you should always stick to your doctor’s recommended dose.

Does Seroquel have an antidepressant effect?

Seroquel itself is not an antidepressant. It is primarily used for the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The drug can be used for other conditions as well, including autism, and irritability. However, it is even approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to be used as add-on therapy with antidepressants. The combination of Seroquel and antidepressants can actively work in the treatment and management of major depressive disorder (MDD). 

What medications should not be taken with Seroquel?

  • Certain antibiotics including macrolides. Examples are clarithromycin, azithromycin, and erythromycin. 
  • Antidepressants including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Examples are fluoxetine, sertraline, paroxetine, etc. 
  • Some antifungal agents like ketoconazole, itraconazole, fluconazole etc. 
  • Certain antiarrhythmic medications like quinidine
  • Medications used to treat HIV including ritonavir, indinavir, etc.

Can Wellbutrin and Seroquel be taken together?

Yes, Wellbutrin and Seroquel can be taken together, but only if prescribed by your healthcare provider. Wellbutrin is well known for causing seizures and it is considered one of the major complications that could possibly arise from Wellbutrin use. Seroquel, on the other hand, can also cause this side effect. 

The combination therapy may increase the risk of seizures in normal and healthy individuals. This possible complication is the reason why the use of this combination is limited to people who do not have epilepsy. 

References 

[Sassy_Social_Share type="standard"]