Trigender (Everything you need to know)

In this blog post, we will explain what being a trigender means. We will define the non-binary identity and the general term of gender identity. 

What does it mean to be a trigender?

Being a trigender means identifying oneself as three genders simultaneously or oscillating between them.

Thus, a person can consider themselves as a female, male and another non-binary identity. 

Non-binary sex has nothing to do with the actual sex or binary code used to encode computer data.

Non-binary sex is actually the way people who do not have sex are designated that fall into the two (binary) categories that you know as the classic “woman” or “man”.

We live in a diverse and beautiful world, and in the end, all we want is to be accepted for who we feel we are, excluding the rules, the social norms and stereotypes related to gender identity. 

But what exactly is gender identity and how can someone consider themselves a trigender? 

About gender identity 

For the delimitation within the same identity of two distinct components‚ related to consciousness biological and social qualities, there were proposed two terms: 

  • sex to define biological qualities what marks the differences between men and women and 
  • gender, which indicates socio-cultural traits.

The term “gender” in the current sense was first used by the British psychologist Robert Stoller11 in 1968‚ being taken over by the theorists of the feminist movement for defining socio-cultural differences between masculinity and femininity.

Thus, a detachment from the traditional term sex was achieved. Later some authors attributed socio-biological affiliation to the term.

The theme of the research was problem-oriented identification and formation of the concept of self under the root

gender identity, historical and spatial, cultural and ethnic influences, but, especially, 

towards that of gender relations.

In this context, fueled by the feminist movement worldwide, the issue of gender differences has become increasingly important in research and currently appears to be one of the most discussed subjects.

Various concepts and guidelines can be mentioned, which reveal the presence or absence of differences significant differences between genders, using as a point of reference to the various parameters: 

  • Biological – genetic 
  • Somatic – the physical feeling
  • Psychological – at the level of reasons, interests, skills; 
  • social – the impact of cultural-normative influences, stating by the socialization of distinct identities, etc. 

The theme of differences and similarities between genders is not just an object of scientific investigation.

Currently, when there is a considerable change in content and distribution of social roles, this aspect is of great concern to those who face it in daily practice with the disturbances produced by those changes.

According to genetic studies ‚the initial mechanism of gender differentiation consists of the interrelation of the triad: hormone, brain, behaviour.

Until recently, it was asserted that there is only the relationship between hormones and behaviour, the former having a decisive role.

But according to recent research, it has been shown that there may be a

inverse relationship, i.e. external factors can influence into some extent appropriate hormonal secretions differentiation mechanism. 

It turns out that hormones regulate development processes, but also depend on the environment’s external information.

At the same time, the brain performs the behaviour programming function both according to the male and female model, which depends,

ultimately, the conditions of individual development.

Ultimately, hormones determine the differentiation of the nerve channels of some

sections of the brain that regulate sexual differentiation and, consequently, behaviour.

Sexual identity 

Awareness of sexual identity takes place in early ontogenesis: at 2-3 years the child distinguishes girls from boys and realizes his sexual affiliation.

But only at 4-5 years, the child possesses the ability to correctly determine other people’s sex. 

But as experimental research has shown‚ even at this age children still think that sex can be changed, if this is desired thing, since until 6-7 years they do not perceive the constancy in ambience‚ considering that everything can be changed.

Cognitive development and integration of social knowledge lead to the assertion of sexual identity.

Perception of differences and self-awareness sexual affiliations are presented as an important activity in gender identification, but incomplete, because gender identity is more complex than sexual identity or ‘better said’ includes the latter and adapts to social demands. 

If speaking of sexual affiliation, we refer to the two sexes – women and men, gender identity presents these two entities known and constituted based on the general stereotype accepted, but also a distinct category – that of androgens.

Androgynous identity (Greek: Andros – male and gine – woman), summing up features attributed by tradition femininity or masculinity‚ does not present itself as a

deficient gender identity, but on the contrary, bimodal.

To cope with the current social situation and not face disapproval, people who are not in accordance with the traditional prescriptions of the gender role they resort to strategic patterns of behaviour. 

Although the new social situation no longer allows for inequality, in dealing with gender, social competition is manifested still strong. 

Social change and gender identity

There’s good news, however. Social structures and economies are changing ‚ but also mentalities, collective representations, social practices and behavioural styles.

No generation from any corner of the world can no longer hope to evolve within the same economic and socio-psychological structures. 

In psychosocial theory, it is argued that as indicators of social change presents the change of attitude, the situation of imbalance and conflict, the influence of endogenous and exogenous factors.

Thus, we can confidently believe in all the examples that illustrate a change in attitudes towards gender identity and its attributes. 

Different sexual orientations

The “palette” of sexual orientation has diversified greatly in recent times.

In addition to terms already known and widely discussed, such as heterosexuality, homosexuality and bisexuality, sexual identity has acquired new nuances and definitions.

In order to clarify this topic, the American publication “Huffington Post” explained 10 lesser-known terms, which define sexual and romantic identities, less known at this time: 

Pansexual  – Pansexuals are those people who can fall in love sexually, emotionally and spiritually by anyone, regardless of sexual identity. 

Polysexual – Like pansexual, polysexual can be attracted to anyone, regardless of gender, male or female.

However, for polysexual, sexual identity matters. For example, if a polysexual is attracted to women, he will also be attracted to people who identify as women, such as transgender people. 

Panromantic – A panromantic person is emotionally and spiritually attracted to anyone, regardless of gender or gender identity, but is not sexually attracted to them. 

Skoliosexual –  In the case of skoliosexual, sexual attraction is manifested on people of non-binary sexual identity who do not identify with their natural sex, such as transsexuals.

Asexual  – Asexuals are “people who do not feel sexual attraction” and, most of the time, not even emotionally.

According to asexuality.org, they may feel the desire to show affection for a person without having sexual desires. 

Aromatic – An aromatic person feels very little or no romantic attraction to other people. “Aromantic people do not lack the ability to establish emotional or personal connections, but they do not feel the instinctual need to make such connections. This identity is not a choice, but it is innate “, notes asexuality.org. 

Graysexual –  Jared, a man who claims to be graysexual, defines the term as “a bridge between asexuality and sexuality.

Graysexuals can also be identified as heterosexual or homosexual or with any other sexual identity. Although they will feel a physical attraction to other people, they will not necessarily feel the need to have sex. 

Queerplatonic relationships – Queerplatonic relationships are not romantic by nature, but they involve a deeper and more intense emotional connection than in the case of a traditional friendship.

The partners are called, in this case, “zucchini”. 

Demisexual –  A person who defines himself as demisexual does not feel sexual attraction to a person unless he has already established a deep emotional connection with the other, although it is not necessarily about falling in love, so it may not be romantic.

If the connection has an intense romantic character then it is called demiromantic.

Lithromantic –  The term “lithromantic” describes a person who has feelings of love but does not want them to be reciprocal, a type of amorous masochism.

Side Note: I have tried and tested various products and services to help with my anxiety and depression. See my top recommendations here, as well as a full list of all products and services our team has tested for various mental health conditions and general wellness.

Conclusions

In this blog post, we explained what being a trigender means, by defining the concept of gender identity, sexual identity and mentioning some of the different sexual orientations that are out there. 

Being a trigender means identifying oneself as three genders simultaneously or oscillating between them.

Thus, a person can consider themselves as a female, male and another non-binary identity. 

Cognitive development and integration of social knowledge lead to the assertion of sexual identity.

Perception of differences and self-awareness sexual affiliations are presented as an important activity in gender identification, but incomplete, because gender identity is more complex than sexual identity or ‘better said’ includes the latter and adapts to social demands. 

If you have any questions or comments, please let us know!

FAQ about trigender 

What does Trigender mean?

Being a trigender means identifying oneself as three genders simultaneously or oscillating between them.

Thus, a person can consider themselves as a female, male and another non-binary identity. 

What is an Aporagender?

An aporagender is a non-binary type of gender meaning: “a gender-separate from male, female, and anything in between while still having a very strong and specific gendered feeling” 

What does it mean to be a Demigirl?

A demigirl is a type of gender where a person identifies as a woman only partially. 

What is a pansexual person?

A pansexual person, or pansexuality, is sexual attraction or desire, romantic love or emotional attraction to people of all kinds, regardless of gender, nationality, social status or religion.

How many genders are there now?

There are 5 genders now: male, female, hermaphrodite, female pseudohermaphroditism and male pseudohermaphroditism. 

What does the Q stand for in LGBTQ?

The Q in LGBTQ stands for either queer or questioning. LGBT stands for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender. 

Recommendations

Exploring the Dimensions of Human Sexuality, by  Jerrold S. Greenberg

Diversity in Couple and Family Therapy: Ethnicities, Sexualities, and Socioeconomics, by Shalonda Kelly

Identities and Inequalities: Exploring the Intersections of Race, Class, Gender, & Sexuality (B&b Sociology) by David Newman 

Just Your Type: Create the Relationship You’ve Always Wanted Using the Secrets of Personality Type, by Paul D. Tieger 

What we recommend for Relationship & LGBTQ issues

Relationship counselling

  • If you are having relationship issues or maybe you are in an abusive relationship then relationship counselling could be your first point of call. Relationship counselling could be undertaken by just you, it does not require more than one person.

LGBTQ issues

If you are dealing with LGBTQ issues then LGBTQ counselling may be a great option for you. Maybe you are confused as to your role and identity or simply need someone to speak to. LGBTQ counsellors are specially trained to assist you in this regard.

References

Bennet, W. E., Student Perceptions and Expectations for Male and Female Instructors: Evidence Relating to the Questions of Gender Bias in Teaching Evaluation. Journal of Education Psychology, 1982, no. 74, pp. 170-179.

Bernard, H., Evaluation Process of higher education. Theory and practice. University of Montreal, 1992, 174 

Feldman, K. A., College Students Views of Male and Female College Teachers: Part II – Evidence from Students Evaluation of Their Classroom Teachers. Research in Higher Education, 1993, vol 34, no. 2, pp. 151-211.

Kierstead, D., DAgostino, P., Dill, H., Sex role stereotyping of college professors: Bias in

student’s ”rating of instructors. Journal of Educational Psychology, 1988, 80 (3), pp. 342-344.

Was this post helpful?

[Sassy_Social_Share type="standard"]