Resignation letter from the New York Times(5 samples)

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This blog post will show you samples of “Resignation letter from the New York Times.”

Writing a “New York Time resignation letter.”

When writing a “New York Times resignation letter,” these are some of the things that you need to keep in mind.

  • The first step is to tell your employer about leaving New York Times and the final work date. Keep it short as the essential part of the letter is the Last Date of your work.
  • Indicate the reason you are leaving New York Times. It would be best to be polite as you will leave a positive impression on your employer. Maintain your composure when drafting the letter.
  • Finally, thank your employer for the position and the opportunities you have enjoyed during your work period.
  • Ensure you proofread your letter before sending it to your employer. You can send the letter to your family and friend to check for grammatical errors.

Sample 1: “Resignation letter from the New York Times”

Dear A.G.,

It is with sadness that I write to tell you that I am resigning from The New York Times. 

I joined the paper with gratitude and optimism three years ago. I was hired with the goal of bringing in voices that would not otherwise appear in your pages: first-time writers, centrists, conservatives and others who would not naturally think of The Times as their home. The reason for this effort was clear: The paper’s failure to anticipate the outcome of the 2016 election meant that it didn’t have a firm grasp of the country it covers. Dean Baquet and others have admitted as much on various occasions. The priority in Opinion was to help redress that critical shortcoming.

I was honored to be part of that effort, led by James Bennet. I am proud of my work as a writer and as an editor. Among those I helped bring to our pages: the Venezuelan dissident Wuilly Arteaga; the Iranian chess champion Dorsa Derakhshani; and the Hong Kong Christian democrat Derek Lam. Also: Ayaan Hirsi Ali, Masih Alinejad, Zaina Arafat, Elna Baker, Rachael Denhollander, Matti Friedman, Nick Gillespie, Heather Heying, Randall Kennedy, Julius Krein, Monica Lewinsky, Glenn Loury, Jesse Singal, Ali Soufan, Chloe Valdary, Thomas Chatterton Williams, Wesley Yang, and many others.

But the lessons that ought to have followed the election—lessons about the importance of understanding other Americans, the necessity of resisting tribalism, and the centrality of the free exchange of ideas to a democratic society—have not been learned. Instead, a new consensus has emerged in the press, but perhaps especially in this paper: that truth isn’t a process of collective discovery, but an orthodoxy already known to an enlightened few whose job is to inform everyone else.

My own forays into Wrongthink have made me the subject of constant bullying by colleagues who disagree with my views. They have called me a Nazi and a racist; I have learned to brush off comments about how I’m “writing about the Jews again.” Several colleagues perceived to be friendly with me were badgered by coworkers. My work and my character are openly demeaned on company-wide Slack channels where masthead editors regularly weigh in. There, some coworkers insist I need to be rooted out if this company is to be a truly “inclusive” one, while others post axe emojis next to my name. 

For these young writers and editors, there is one consolation. As places like The Times and other once-great journalistic institutions betray their standards and lose sight of their principles, Americans still hunger for news that is accurate, opinions that are vital, and debate that is sincere. I hear from these people every day. “An independent press is not a liberal ideal or a progressive ideal or a democratic ideal. It’s an American ideal,” you said a few years ago. I couldn’t agree more. America is a great country that deserves a great newspaper. 

None of this means that some of the most talented journalists in the world don’t still labor for this newspaper. They do, which is what makes the illiberal environment especially heartbreaking. I will be, as ever, a dedicated reader of their work. But I can no longer do the work that you brought me here to do—the work that Adolph Ochs described in that famous 1896 statement: “to make of the columns of The New York Times a forum for the consideration of all questions of public importance, and to that end to invite intelligent discussion from all shades of opinion.”

Ochs’s idea is one of the best I’ve encountered. And I’ve always comforted myself with the notion that the best ideas win out. But ideas cannot win on their own. They need a voice. They need a hearing. Above all, they must be backed by people willing to live by them. 

Sincerely,

Bari”

Sample 2: “Resignation letter from the New York Times”

To,

Gaurav Singh,

Manager, New York Times,

Block-D, 14, Connaught Place,

New Delhi- 110026

Date: March 21, 2017.

From,

Shreya Kashyap,

Writer, New York Times

A-55/6, Sector 7,

Rohini, New Delhi- 110023

Subject: Resignation letter

Dear Gaurav Sir,

I’m writing this letter to resign from the post of writer for the New York Times. I’ll complete my tenure for this month and will be resigning after that. I have learned a lot while working here and cherish the time spent here. The last five years have passed smoothly working under your guidance.

I’m resigning due to internal conflicts in the team. It has cost me strain on working relationships. The issues seemed to be difficult to solve, and I find it hard working in such an environment. I tried to bring up the matter to our HR Manager, but it was in vain. However, I’ve no hard feelings toward anyone, and I’m leaving the work with a happy heart. I wish you good luck in your future work.

Sincerely

Shreya Kashyap,

(Signature)”

Sample 3: “Resignation letter from the New York Times”

“To,

___________

____________

_________

Date:________(Date on which the letter is written)

From,

_____________

__________

_______

Subject: Resignation letter

Dear_________ (Name of the recipient)

I’m writing this letter to inform you of my resignation from ___________ (name of the company) as an executive news reporter. I’m opening up my broadcasting firm in the city. The work and values I learned under your guidance will help in building up my career. I had a great time working with your company and will stay closely connected to you.

I will be leaving this job on______(date). During the coming week, I will assist you to find and train a replacement for my position. I require your blessings for my new project. Please let me know if there is anything specific that you would like to be done. I pray for more success to come on your way.

Thanking you,

Yours sincerely,

(Name of the sender)

(Signature)”

Sample 4: “Resignation letter from the New York Times”

“Subject: Resignation letter.

Dear (name of the recipient),

This letter is to notify you that I am resigning from (Company Name) as a writer (Job position). (Date: DD/MM/YY) will be my last day of employment. (Describe in your words).

This wasn’t an easy decision because I am grateful for the rewarding employment I’ve had with (company name). However, after hours of thought process, my decision is now final, and I have accepted the position of assistant reporter with another company. (Describe actual cause and situation). Your support and guidance have encouraged me, and I hope that we will continue our relationship as I move forward in my career. (Describe some things about your job experiences).

Feel free to contact me to make this transition process proceed more smoothly. (Cordially describe your greetings and requirements).

Yours respectfully,

(Name of the sender)”

Sample 5: “Resignation letter from the New York Times”

Dear_________(name of the recipient),

Subject: Resignation letter.

This letter is to notify you that I am resigning from New York Times as an editor. _____ (Date) will be my last day of employment.

This wasn’t an easy decision because I am grateful for the rewarding employment I’ve had with New York Times. However, after hours of thought process, my decision is now final, and I have accepted the position of assistant reporter with another company. Your support and guidance have encouraged me, and I hope that we will continue our relationship as I move forward in my career.

feel free to contact me to make this transition process proceed more smoothly.

Yours respectfully,

(Name of the sender)”

Frequently Asked Questions: Writing a “New York Time resignation letter.”

How do you resign due to a family problem?

You say, “I am resigning for personal reasons,” or “I am resigning because of a family problem that requires all of my time.” If you want to go into more detail, you can explain.

Can I resign immediately?

Yes, you can resign without notice. However, ensure you have a valid reason; schedule a one-on-one meeting with your boss. Before resigning, read your contract to ensure you are not in breach of the contract.

We hope the above blog post was helpful. Please leave your comments and questions below.

Citations

https://www.bariweiss.com/resignation-letter

https://www.themuse.com/advice/how-to-write-a-resignation-letter

https://www.monster.com/career-advice/article/resignation-letter-sample

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