How to stop taking metoprolol 25 mg? (5 terrible side effects)

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This blog post will answer the question, “how to stop taking metoprolol 25 mg?”. We are going to discuss in detail the beneficial effects and the dangers of stopping metoprolol abruptly. We will also discuss necessary measures to ensure safe withdrawal. 

How to stop taking metoprolol 25 mg?

In order to stop taking 25 mg metoprolol, your doctor will gradually decrease the dose over a period of a few days. The duration of withdrawal and the frequency of dose tapering can vary from person to person. 

It is not recommended to stop using metoprolol abruptly as the drug is capable of producing withdrawal symptoms. You may also suffer from rebound symptoms, which are the symptoms associated with the health condition for which you started taking metoprolol in the first place. 

Metoprolol is associated with disturbing cardiological withdrawal symptoms, which include:  

  • Abnormally high blood pressure
  • Worsen angina
  • Chest pain
  • Increased risk of myocardial infarction (heart attack)
  • Severe lightheadedness

These withdrawal effects can be present with variable intensities in different individuals. 

People who have had a heart attack earlier are at higher risk of cardiac side effects and may experience another heart attack if they stop the drug too quickly, that too without their doctor’s approval. 

It is always advised to ask your doctor first before making changes in your medications. 

In many cases, experts noticed that consequences were observed after people meddle with their treatment and change the frequency of administration and dosage without even telling their healthcare provider. 

How does metoprolol work and why is it normally prescribed?

Metoprolol is a beta blockers or beta-adrenergic blocker. It is a drug which blocks beta receptors present in the heart and lungs and inhibits the effects of adrenaline, also known as epinephrine. 

It can also dilate blood vessels and decrease the workload of the heart. Metoprolol can be used for the treatment of following health conditions:

Cardiovascular diseases

Metoprolol are well known for its benefits in patients suffering from different cardiovascular diseases including:

  • High blood pressure 
  • Angina pectoris
  • Management of congestive heart failure 
  • Arrhythmia or irregular heart beat
  • Myocardial infarction 
  • Tachycardia 
  • Coronary artery diseases 

Glaucoma

Metoprolol is given in the form of eye drops to help release some pressure by causing vasodilation. Glaucoma is an ocular disease which is associated with increased intraocular pressure. If left untreated, it may cause blindness.

Migraine

Metoprolol can also be used as part of a first line treatment regimen to help relieve the painful symptoms of migraine. Various studies have revealed that metoprolol can significantly reduce the frequency of migraine attacks and the severity of headache.

Anxiety 

Metoprolol can be used to help relieve the physical symptoms of anxiety by blocking stress hormones, but this is considered an off-label use and is not approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) yet. 

Researchers are still weighing its pros and cons to be officially used as an anxiolytic. 

Tremors

Metoprolol can also be used to treat tremors. It is medically approved to treat tremors. Studies show that people have actually gained relief from tremors after using metoprolol but it still can not provide complete relief. 

It can be taken once or twice a day, as suggested by your healthcare professional. 

What are side effects associated with the use of metoprolol?

Common side effects of metoprolol include:

  • Xerostomia or dry mouth 
  • Nausea 
  • Vomiting 
  • Constipation 
  • Flatulence 
  • Acid reflux 
  • Depression 
  • Fatigue 
  • Lightheadedness 
  • Abnormal pain
  • Acid reflux 
  • Flu like symptoms 
  • Skin rash

Some serious side effects include:

  • Difficulty in breathing and chest tightness 
  • Swollen hands and feet as a result of an allergic reaction. 
  • Wheezing
  • Blackouts 
  • Unexplained weight gain or loss
  • Arrhythmia 

What kind of warnings have been issued related to the use of metoprolol?

Metoprolol comes with the following warnings:

Black box warning

Metoprolol actually comes with a black box warning, issued by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), stating that this med should never be stopped abruptly because of the life threatening risks. This risk is much greater in patients who are at risk of a heart attack.

Metoprolol and breathing disorders

Metoprolol is contraindicated to be used in patients who suffer from chronic breathing illnesses, including asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). 

Metoprolol is a non selective beta blocker which blocks beta-receptors present in heart, lung and airways. This drug causes vasodilation to reduce blood pressure and heart rate, and at the same time, it also causes bronchoconstriction and makes the airways narrow. 

People with asthma and COPD already live with breathing difficulty and this metoprolol bronchoconstriction can make their symptoms much more severe. It can also lead to hospitalisation. This is why the drug would never be prescribed to such patients. 

Metoprolol and diabetes

Metoprolol should be used cautiously in people with diabetes. People who are diabetic are often on prescription medications to manage their blood glucose levels. 

Oftentimes, such people suffer from hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), which is indicated by low heart rate and blood pressure. With metoprolol, the rate rate and blood pressure remain low, which is why a diabetic patient fails to detect the low blood sugar levels. 

For such people, it is advised to monitor their blood sugar levels regularly to avoid getting any complications associated with hypoglycemia. 

Metoprolol and pregnancy

Metoprolol should be used cautiously in pregnancy. You should also ask your healthcare provider if you are trying to get pregnant as this drug may produce unwanted side effects. However, the intensity of these effects can vary from woman to woman. 

Studies have indicated that metoprolol and other beta blockers can pass the placenta and act on the growing fetus, which is exactly why this medication is in Category C of pregnancy medications. 

Metoprolol and breastfeeding

Studies have revealed that metoprolol can pass into the breastmilk and it might cause unwanted effects in the breastfed babies. Make sure you ask your healthcare provider if the use of metoprolol is safe for your child during breastfeeding. 

Metoprolol and poor peripheral blood circulation

Several studies suggested that metoprolol should be used in people who suffer from poor blood flow to several other body parts. This is because metoprolol can end up exacerbating the poor blood flow because the drug further lowers down the heart rate and blood pressure. 

Importance drug tips

  • Do not suggest medications, unless you are a healthcare professional yourself. Do not share medications. You might think your conditions match but oftentimes they don’t. It’s actually pretty dangerous.
  • If you fail to understand how to use the drug properly or have any other question, ask your doctor or pharmacist.
  • In case of overdose, immediately reach out to the hospital. Make sure you properly guide them about how much drug you have taken and when. 
  • If you have missed a dose and you’re way past the usual time at which you take your med, do not take it. It will cause you to overdose when you take your next dose, which is not too far away. It’s better to skip the missed dose and take the next one. If you remember your missed dose earlier, it’s safe for you to take it.

Conclusion

In this blog post, we have discussed the safe withdrawal of 25 mg metoprolol. In order to stop metoprolol,  your doctor will gradually decrease the dose over a period of a few days. 

It is not recommended to stop using metoprolol abruptly as the drug is capable of producing withdrawal symptoms including abnormally high blood pressure, worsen angina, chest pain, increased risk of myocardial infarction (heart attack) and severe lightheadedness. 

People who have had a heart attack earlier are at higher risk of cardiac side effects and may experience another heart attack if they stop the drug too quickly. Always make sure you properly ask your healthcare provider before making any changes in your treatment plan.

FAQs: how to stop taking metoprolol 25 mg

Can I stop taking metoprolol on my own?

No, you should never stop taking metoprolol on your own. In order to stop taking metoprolol, your doctor will gradually decrease the dose over a period of a few days. It is not recommended to stop using metoprolol abruptly as the drug is capable of producing withdrawal symptoms. 

You may also suffer from rebound symptoms, which are the symptoms associated with the health condition for which you started taking metoprolol in the first place.

Metoprolol is associated with disturbing cardiological withdrawal symptoms, which include abnormally high blood pressure, worsen angina, chest pain, increased risk of myocardial infarction (heart attack) and severe lightheadedness. 

How long does it take to stop taking metoprolol?

The duration of metoprolol withdrawal and the frequency of dose tapering can vary from person to person. Your doctor will recommend the appropriate time period until which your metoprolol will be tapered and then will be stopped. The time duration also depends on the health condition for which you started taking metoprolol in the first place. 

Is 25mg of metoprolol a lot?

No, 25 mg metoprolol is not a lot. It can be used in doses much higher than 25 mg. The appropriate dose of metoprolol depends on the type and severity of your health condition. It is not recommended to start using any medication without your doctor’s approval. 

How long does metoprolol 25 mg stay in your system?

The half life of metoprolol is around 3-8 hours, which means that the concentration of this drug in your body is reduced to half after this time period has passed. 

The remaining amount of metoprolol is further reduced to half within the next 3-8 hours. The concentration of the drug keeps getting halved by this process, until it is completely washed out from your system. 

What can I take instead of metoprolol?

You can take other beta blockers instead of metoprolol. They include:

  • Propranolol (Inderal) 
  • Atenolol (Tenormin) 
  • Esmolol (Brevibloc) 
  • Sotalol (Betapace) 
  • Acebutolol (Sectral) 
  • Bisoprolol (Monocor) 
  • Nadolol (Corgard) 

If beta blockers do not suit you generally, there are several other classes of drugs which can help maintain your blood pressure and reduce your heart rate. These include:

  • Calcium channel blockers
  • Angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors/ACE Inhibitors
  • Angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs)
  • Alpha blockers
  • Ivabradine 

What does 25 mg of metoprolol do?

25 mg metoprolol can block beta receptors present in the heart and lungs and inhibit the effects of adrenaline, also known as epinephrine. It can also dilate blood vessels and decrease the workload of the heart. 

References

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