Can a weighted blanket make you sore?

In this blog post, we will answer the following question: can a weighted blanket make you sore?

We also write about the benefits of weighted blankets and what are the possible causes for waking up sore. 

Can a weighted blanket make you sore?

The weighted blankets are made of several layers of material, among which there is a filling with materials that give them weight.

Hence the name of weighted blankets or heavy blankets.

People worry if a weighted blanket can be too heavy for them to use. But this type of blanket has been designed to weigh about 10% of your body weight to relax you naturally, simulating the feeling of being held in someone’s arms.

As long as you choose them according to your body weight, these types of blankets cannot make you sore or cause any type of pain whatsoever. 

What is a weighted blanket? 

A compression blanket is much heavier than a regular blanket because it is full of special balls.

They minimize body movement by applying weight to the body, helping you fall asleep faster and rest better, inducing relaxation and relieving anxiety.

Studies have shown that using a compression blanket can improve your sleep by creating a feeling of relaxation and peace by simulating a hug.

This simulated hug calms you by stimulating the parasympathetic nervous system and helps you relax as soon as you stay in bed, giving you the best sleep your body deserves.

The special BPA-free glass beads evenly distributed in the compression blanket provide extra weight and a soothing, light pressure on the whole body.

This encourages the production of serotonin and melatonin – hormones that help you improve your mood. They induce relaxation and relieve anxiety for a relaxing sleep.

This type of blanket has been designed to weigh about 10% of your body weight to relax you naturally, simulating the feeling of being held in someone’s arms.

Whether you’re taking a nap, watching TV or reading a book,  the compression blanket is not only ideal for a good night’s sleep – it brings calm, comfort and relaxation at any time, day or night.

The effects of a compression blanket

The compression blanket helps you sleep better in the following ways:

  • Deep sleep – the pressure created by the blanket mimics the feeling of hugging to stimulate the level of melatonin, which improves the quality of sleep
  • Feel calmer – Increases serotonin levels, calms you, sensory processing and finally reduces the activity in the nervous system
  • You live happier – Reduces anxiety and stress by bringing the feeling of refreshing mornings and helps increase productivity
  • Fall asleep faster – Due to the weight, the blanket helps to relax and makes you feel less stressed and much more relaxed.

Tips for using a compression blanket

  • The compression blanket is not recommended for use by children weighing less than 38.5 kg.
  • The weight of the blanket must not exceed 10% of the weight of the user’s body.
  • Never use a damp blanket; neither on or near the water.
  • In case of permanent damage, make sure that the product is stored properly in accordance with local legislation.

Other causes for waking up sore

We already have established that a weighted blanket can not make you sore. But what is the reason behind inflammation then?

What is inflammation?

Inflammation is the body’s normal protective response to trauma.

It occurs when white blood cells fight to protect us from infection, such as bacteria or viruses.

It can also occur when the body is injured, for example, if you suffer a stretch while exercising, it can often become painful, swollen and inflamed.

Inflammation normally helps the body produce white blood cells that help protect the immune system.

When the autoimmune system responds too strongly or for an inappropriate cause, it can maintain inflammation for too long.

How long does the inflammation last?

Acute inflammation is an immune response that usually lasts only a few days and is normally beneficial for healing, although it is often accompanied by unpleasant sensations such as itching or pain.

It occurs when the immune system tries to protect the organs from infections and injuries.

Its purpose is to locate and remove the affected tissue so that the body can begin the healing process.

Symptoms of inflammation

There are five signs or symptoms that may indicate an acute inflammation: redness, heat, oedema, pain, and finding that it is difficult for you to move the affected area of the body normally.

Some inflammations may be minor and affect only a small area and heal on their own, but they can also be extensive, painful and require treatment.

There are many anti-inflammatory drugs on the market that are available with or without a prescription.

Unfortunately, many have side effects that can be problematic. Paracetamol and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen, can cause problems with the stomach, liver or kidneys.

And very strong anti-inflammatory drugs such as corticosteroids, such as prednisolone, lead over time to hypertension, weight gain and acne.

That is why many individuals with chronic inflammation prefer natural treatments, with fewer side effects.

Diagnosis and treatment

73% of people know that inflammation is a factor that triggers pain.

If your pain is severe or persists for a long time, you should consult a doctor who will perform a physical examination and may require blood tests or imaging tests, such as x-rays, MRIs or CT scans to determine the cause of the inflammation.

A doctor may also recommend treatment, such as the administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which are used for anti-inflammatory purposes and for pain relief.

Some natural treatments for inflammation include:

Omega 3 fatty acids – Omega 3 fatty acids are a type of fat that is healthy for the body, which cannot create on its own.

Therefore, its proper functioning is based on a healthy diet or Omega 3 fatty acid supplements.

Foods rich in Omega 3 are fatty fish (salmon, tuna, cod, etc.), seafood (shrimp, lobster, shellfish, etc.), nuts, flax, chia, pumpkin and sunflower seeds, cabbage, cauliflower and spinach.

Most of the time, the regular diet includes too few sources of Omega 3. That is why we can supplement it with fish oil capsules, which will be just as effective.

Studies have shown the effectiveness of Omega 3 supplements in reducing inflammation.

For example, approximately 59% of participants in a 2011 study successfully gave up nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in favour of fish oil capsules.

S-Adenosylmethionine (abbreviated SAM-e) is a substance that our bodies create, with a role in the epigenetic regulation of genes.

SAM-e supplements are prescribed by doctors for depression, osteoarthritis and inflammation of the liver. 

The dose depends on the severity of the problem, and starts at 200 mg for fibromyalgia and can reach 1200 mg per day for osteoarthritis.

However, SAM-e has side effects compared to many other categories of medications, so consult your doctor before taking these supplements.

Zinc has beneficial effects on the body, the most important of which is to reduce oxidative stress, a situation in which the body has more free radicals than antioxidants.

It has been shown that people with zinc deficiencies are more likely to develop polyarthritis. The recommended daily dose of zinc is 8 mg for women and 11 mg for men.

Exceeding 40 mg a day can be dangerous because it interacts with calcium, diuretics and antibiotics.

Turmeric is a plant of the ginger family, native to Southeast Asia. Curcumin is the compound that gives it its yellow colour and has an anti-inflammatory effect in the body.

One study showed that turmeric increases insulin sensitivity by correcting hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia.

The effect of turmeric is very potentiated, only 1.5 grams per day being enough for a lasting effect.

If you experience acute inflammation such as a common cold, or chronic inflammation such as ulcerative colitis, try to prepare a cup of “golden milk” once a day. 

Dissolve a quarter or half teaspoon of turmeric (to taste) in a cup of milk, then boil it with a cinnamon stick until it reaches the temperature you want.

For a complete beneficial effect, do not add any sweetener to the milk.

Green tea – It is a well-known fact that people consuming green tea face significantly fewer inflammatory diseases. Antioxidants in green tea inhibit the development of inflammation-inducing substances.

That’s why doctors recommend about 300-400 mg of green tea extract a day. 

Drinking prepared green tea is also beneficial, but watch out for the amount of caffeine! Green tea contains caffeine, much less than in a cup of coffee, but which in excess can create gastric problems such as diarrhoea.

Capsaicin (hot pepper) – Although it irritates the eyes and skin, capsaicin (the stinging substance in hot peppers) has beneficial effects on the body. It is normally a substance that protects the fruit (pepper) from birds and predators. 

Applied to inflamed areas of the body, it has the role of reducing the sensation of pain.

Capsaicin patches are especially used in people with joint pain.

Because they can be used only in the affected areas, they have a strong and immediate effect, eliminating the potential gastric problems of eating hot peppers.

Cat’s claw extract – Uncaria tomentosa, or cat’s claw, is a climbing plant from Central America, with an effect of reducing inflammation.

A cup of claw tea daily, prepared with 1 gram of the plant in 200 ml of water will relieve inflammation in the body.

Or you can consume it in capsule form, the recommended dose being 20-60 mg per day. 

Be careful if you have been diagnosed with lupus! Cat’s claws can cause kidney failure in people with lupus.

Incense extract – Boswellia serrata resin extract, or incense extract, can reduce the sensation of pain and inflammation.

It can even stop cartilage damage and help patients with osteoarthritis in just 5 days. The recommended dose is 300-500 mg two to three times a day.

Ask your doctor before starting any natural treatment for inflammation. Chances are, even if low, that natural products will interact with the medications you are already taking and cause side effects.

Conclusions

In this blog post, we answered the following question: can a weighted blanket make you sore?

We also wrote about the benefits of weighted blankets and what are the possible causes behind waking up sore. 

 The weighted blanket has three layers, the outer layers are the coating and in the middle, there is a heavy filling.

There are several types of fillings here. You can choose between plastic granules and glass granules.

This type of blanket has been designed to weigh about 10% of your body weight to relax you naturally, simulating the feeling of being held in someone’s arms.

As long as you choose them according to your body weight, these types of blankets cannot make you sore or cause any type of pain whatsoever. 

If you have any questions, comments or recommendations, do not hesitate to contact us!

FAQ on can a weighted blanket make you sore

Do weighted blankets make you sore?

No, weighted blankets should not make you sore. 

As long as you choose them according to your body weight, these types of blankets cannot make you sore or cause any type of pain whatsoever. 

Can a weighted blanket be too heavy for a child?

Yes, a weighted blanket can be too heavy for a child.

It is not recommended for children weighing less than 38.5 kg to use a weighted blanket.  

Is it OK to sleep with a weighted blanket every night?

Yes, it is OK to sleep with a weighted blanket every night.

The pressure created by the blanket mimics the feeling of hugging to stimulate the level of melatonin, which improves the quality of sleep.

Why would you use a weighted blanket?

A weighted blanket increases serotonin levels, calms you, sensory processing and finally reduces the activity in the nervous system.

It also reduces anxiety and stress by bringing the feeling of refreshing mornings and helps increase productivity.

References

Sensorydirect.com

Calmingblankets.co.uk

The study “Natural anti-inflammatory agents for pain relief”, published in Surgical Neurology International, in 2010, authors: Joseph C. Maroon, Jeffrey W. Bost, Adara Maroon.

The study “New mechanisms and the anti-inflammatory role of curcumin in obesity and obesity-related metabolic diseases”, published in the European Journal of Nutrition, in 2011, authors: Adeeb Shehzad, Taewook Ha, Fazli Subhan, Young Sup Lee

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