Bubble wrap activities for gross motor skills

In this article, we will look at bubble wrap activities to help develop gross motor skills. This article also explores gross motor skills in detail and gross motor skills for babies, toddlers and preschoolers. 

Bubble wrap activities for gross motor skills

Bubble wrap is one of those amazing things that kids can’t get enough of. It might be just the thing to keep them inspired to get moving. Let’s look at some fun methods to get things going.

Here are some fun bubble wrap activities/games to help develop your child’s gross motor skills:

  • Bubble Wrap Hopscotch
  • Bubble Wrap Races
  • Bubble Wrap Paths
  • Blindfolded Bubble Wrap Path
  • Rolling Pin Races
  • Popping Paws

Bubble Wrap Hopscotch

This is a very self-explanatory activity. Set up bubble wrap sheets with numbers written on them and let the games begin! A hesitant kid is tempted to play with the bubble wrap. This is how hopscotch can be converted into a sensory number game.

Bubble Wrap Races

The bubble wrap should be placed on the ground. Allow the kids to use their tricycles, bicycles, and scooties to ride over the bubble wrap. One of the kids’ favourite bubble wrap games is this one!

Bubble Wrap Paths

This is an excellent method to practise motor planning. You may make trails out of bubble wrap that run up, down, and around, and have the kids follow them. To practise crossing the midline, try setting it out in an unending loop. For an introductory alphabet game, you might put it out in the shape of letters.

Blindfolded Bubble Wrap Path

Blindfold the children and make them feel their way along the trail. Begin with a simple path, then branch out in unexpected ways. Go up, over, and around obstacles as well as varied textures. You may even change up the game by having them place their hands behind their backs or on their heads.

Put on blindfolds, have the trail traverse over unusual surfaces and in an unexpected direction, and give out commands like “Place your hand behind your back” to make it even more difficult. “Now, jump on one foot!” or “Walk backward!”

Rolling Pin Races

Once you call go, the kids will get down on all fours and line up on one end of their bubble wrap tracks, then roll as quickly as they can to the other end. This rapidly inevitably turns into a competition to see who can pop the most bubbles.

Popping Paws

Fold each of the four square pieces of bubble wrap in half. After that, wrap one around each limb and secure it with packing tape. Ask them to act like lions and tigers, and they’ll scamper around chuckling until the bubble wrap keeps popping.

Fine Motor Activities With Bubble Wrap 

By popping the bubbles in the wrap with their thumb and index finger, our kids and students may really acquire fine motor skills. Because the kid must guide their fingers to pop certain bubbles, this activity improves both finger strength and hand to eye coordination.

Wraps with smaller bubbles should be used if possible, as larger bubbles will not teach fine motor skills as efficiently. When youngsters learn to use their smaller muscles, such as those in their hands, fingers, and wrists, they develop fine motor skills.

Here are some fun bubble wrap activities/games to help develop your child’s fine motor skills:

  • Pop the Bubbles!
  • Paint with Bubble Wrap

Pop the Bubbles!

At some time in our lives, we’ve all relished popping bubble wrap. Did you know that popping bubble wrap strengthens your fingers and improves your fine motor coordination? It can also help to calm a hyperactive child.

Paint with Bubble Wrap

Bubble wrap may be used to create interesting paint effects. Wrap bubble wrap around a roller. Use tape to keep it in place. Dip your roller into the paint and run it on the paper. The lovely texture they produce on the paper will delight the children. You can also take bubble wrap painting to the next level by wrapping it around the kids’ feet and having them walk in the paint.

What are Gross Motor Skills?

While a brain grows and begins to explore their environment, they will learn new skills. One set of abilities they’ll add to their arsenal of skills straight away is gross motor skills. 

Gross motor skills are the skills that allow us to perform tasks that require the use of big muscles in the torso, legs, and arms. They include full-body movement. From running to climbing stairs, we employ gross motor skills in a variety of physical tasks.

The majority of people use these skills on a regular basis and without thinking about it. However, gross motor skills are more complicated than they appear.

They include muscular coordination as well as the nervous system. They have an effect on one’s balance and coordination. They also serve as the foundation for fine motor skills, which allow us to do fine movements such as writing with a pencil.

Other skills are linked to gross motor skills. Here are a few of them:

  • Balance
  • Coordination
  • Body awareness
  • Physical strength
  • Reaction time

Poor gross motor skills can affect people in many aspects of their lives. It might make it difficult to complete important activities at school, work, and at home. Self-esteem can be harmed by difficulties with motor skills.

Gross motor skills are those skills that involve the whole body — your core muscles (think belly and back) and the muscles of your arms and legs.

Gross motor skills include skills such as:

  • sitting
  • standing
  • walking
  • running
  • jumping
  • lifting (a spoon, a hairbrush, a barbell — they all count)
  • kicking

Yup, these are actually skills.

And then there are the skills that need, well, a little more skill:

  • riding a bike or a horse
  • playing sports like football or baseball
  • roller blading
  • swimming

From Healthline

Examples of Gross Motor Skills

As a kid reaches the age of two, gross motor skills expand to encompass things like bending down to pick up a toy, running, climbing stairs, and kicking or throwing a ball. 

In only one year, as a parent of a toddler, you may observe a significant change in your child’s gross motor skills. You may remark, “He could hardly walk at first, and now he’s racing all over the place.”

Children begin to learn complicated gross motor skills such as leaping (in both place and forward) and balancing solely on a single foot as they approach the age of three or four. Their ability to climb stairs and throw a ball has also significantly improved.

By providing lots of good opportunities to play, you can help your child grow in this area. Plan outdoor recreational activities like sandbox fun, treasure hunts, and garden maintenance on a regular basis. 

Indoor activities including yoga and hide-and-seek might be encouraged. Buy a basketball hoop or a set of tiny balls or even a trampoline. Encourage your child to play freely after showing them.

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The Takeaway

Parents must use caution to prevent unknowingly hindering the development of a child’s gross motor abilities. Some parents, for example, regularly carry their toddlers in strollers. Instead, focus on allowing your children to practise their walking abilities to aid in developing gross motor skills.

You may get them out of the stroller for a bit and let them to balance by holding onto the side. When it’s time to walk down the street or the kids have had enough, you can put them back in the stroller.

You may get them out of the stroller for a bit and let them balance by holding onto the side. When it’s time to walk down the street or the kids have had enough, you can put them back in the stroller.

Monitoring your child’s gross motor abilities is a good method to evaluate if he or she is meeting developmental milestones. However, not every child develops at the same rate.

Some children will acquire some skills faster than others. Consult your physician if you believe your kid is experiencing developmental delays. Report on your child’s development so that you can work collectively.

Conclusion

In this article, we looked at bubble wrap activities to help develop gross motor skills. This article also explored gross motor skills in detail and gross motor skills for babies, toddlers and preschoolers. 

Frequently Asked Questions: Bubble Wrap Gross Motor Activities

Why are gross motor skills important?

Gross motor skills training allows a child to acquire strength and confidence in his or her body. It also encourages children to exercise and engage in physical activity, both of which are essential for a healthy lifestyle. These abilities improve a child’s capacity to perform more complicated tasks in the future, such as playing football as a team.

Why are fine motor skills important?

The small muscles that control the hand, fingers, and thumb are used in fine motor skills. They help youngsters with crucial tasks such as eating themselves, gripping toys, buttoning and zipping clothing, writing, and drawing. As children get older, their fine motor skills will develop and improve.

How do poor gross motor skills affect people?

Poor gross motor skills can affect people in many aspects of their lives. It might make it difficult to complete important activities at school, work, and at home. Self-esteem can be harmed by difficulties with motor skills.

References

What Are Gross Motor Skills?

Examples of Gross Motor Skills in Children

Bubble wrap for building fine motor skills?

Brilliant Bubble Wrap Activities & Gross Motor Games

MOVEMENT MONDAY GROSS MOTOR PLAY IDEAS: BUBBLE WRAP!

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